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Nouns

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Nouns

Nouns


A noun names a person, a place, a thing, or an idea.

PERSONS accountant, neighbor, athlete, George Washington Carver
PLACES library, gymnasium, village, South Dakota
THINGS calendar, shelves, streetlight, Declaration of Independence
IDEAS truth, self-awareness, humor, belief, Confucianism

Common Nouns and Proper Nouns

Common Nouns and Proper Nouns


A common noun names any one of a group of persons, places, things, or ideas. A common noun is capitalized only when it begins a sentence or is part of a title. 

A proper noun names a particular person, place, thing, or idea. A proper noun is always capitalized.

COMMON NOUNS monarch, state, era, treaty
PROPER NOUNS Queen Anne, Alaska, Renaissance, Treaty of Versailles

Concrete Nouns and Abstract Nouns

Concrete Nouns and Abstract Nouns


A concrete noun names a person, a place, or a thing that can be perceived by one or more of the five senses (sight, hearing, taste, touch, and smell). 

An abstract noun names an idea, feeling, quality, or characteristic that cannot be perceived by one or more of the five senses.

CONCRETE NOUNS screen, Munich, Kobe Bryant, cactus
ABSTRACT NOUNS dedication, courtesy, satisfaction, leisure

Collective Nouns

Collective Nouns


The singular form of a collective noun names a group. Some collective nouns are family, team, council, audience, and herd.

EXAMPLES 
  • The shepherd tended the flock that was grazing in the pasture. [Flock names a group of animals.]
  • The committee voted for the proposal. [Committee names a group of people.]

Compound Nouns

Compound Nouns


A compound noun is made up of two or more words that together name a person, a place, a thing, or an idea. A compound noun may be written as one word, as two or more separate words, or as a hyphenated word.

ONE WORD raindrop, flagship, playground, swordfish, Iceland
SEPARATE WORDS civil liberty, assistant professor, Cape Verde, rock salt
HYPHENATED WORD out-of-towner, make-believe, two-by-fours

Singular Nouns and Plural Nouns

Singular Nouns and Plural Nouns


Singular nouns are nouns that refer to only one person, place or thing. 

A plural noun refers to more than one of something. Many singular nouns just need an S added at the end to make them plural (e.g., bee becomes bees). For some nouns that already end with an S, you may need to add -es to the end to make their plural forms (e.g., classes and buses). Some singular nouns also change spelling when made plural (e.g. countries and babies).

Not all nouns follow this pattern. Those that become plural in other ways are called irregular plural nouns. Some examples are man and men, wolf and wolves, foot and feet, and sheep and … sheep.

SINGULAR NOUNS: house, cat, girl, foot, country
REGULAR PLURAL NOUNS: houses, cats, girls, countries
IRREGULAR PLURAL NOUNS: person and people life and lives mouse and mice tooth and teeth

Countable Nouns and Uncountable Nouns

Countable Nouns and Uncountable Nouns


A countable noun is one that you can count. When you have three books or 10 pennies, you are describing a noun that is countable.

An uncountable noun is one that cannot be counted. For example, happiness cannot be counted. You don’t say that you have “a happiness” or “three happinesses.” Uncountable nouns typically don’t have plural forms.

COUNTABLE NOUNS: table, apple, rabbit, ear
UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS: salt, seafood, luggage, advice

Nouns Quiz

Nouns Quiz


Decide what kind is the bold noun. Choose all that apply.
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