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Conjunctions

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Conjunctions

Conjunctions

A conjunction joins words or word groups.

Coordinating and Correlative Conjunctions

Coordinating and Correlative Conjunctions

A coordinating conjunction joins words or word groups that are used in the same way. The coordinating conjunctions are and, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet. 

EXAMPLES 
  • In the morning, the team jogs and does sit-ups. [And joins two verbs, jogs and does.] 
  • Your keys are in your purse or on the table. [Or joins two phrases, in your purse and on the table.] 
  • It’s raining, so the seats are wet. [So joins two clauses, It’s raining and the seats are wet.]
Correlative conjunctions are pairs of conjunctions that join words or word groups that are used in the same way. The correlative conjunctions are both . . . and, either . . . or, neither . . . nor, not only . . . but also, and whether . . . or.

EXAMPLES 
  • Both Tiffany and Russell are from Denver. [Both . . . and joins two nouns, Tiffany and Russell.] 
  • Not only did we discover a boat, but we also found oars and a life preserver. [Not only . . . but also joins two clauses, did we discover a boat and we found oars and a life preserver.]

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating Conjunctions

A subordinating conjunction begins a subordinate clause and connects that clause to an independent clause. Some commonly used subordinating conjunctions are after, although, because, before, how, if, in order that, so that, unless, until, whenever, whether, and while.

EXAMPLES 
  • We left early because the weather was bad. [Because begins the subordinate clause because the weather was bad and connects it to the independent clause.] 
  • If the weather is bad, we’ll leave early. [If introduces the subordinate clause If the weather is bad. The subordinate clause is connected to the independent clause.]

Conjunctions Quiz

Conjunctions Quiz

Choose what type is the bold conjunction.

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